National Anger Management Association

Home

Join NAMA Information

Anger Management Certification

Domestic Violence Certification 

Renew Active Membership

Member Login

 

Renew Active Membership

National Anger Management Specialist Directory

Anger Management Specialist Certification Trainings

Anger Management Assessment

AuthorizedAnger Management Training  Professionals

AuthorizedAnger Management Supervisors

Anger Management Consultants

CEU info

CEU Opportunities

Latest Newsletters

Newsletter  Sign-Up

Download Forms & Seals

Starting a Local Chapter Manual

Japan Chapter of NAMA

Midwest Chapter of NAMA

California Chapter of NAMA

 

Recent NEWSLETTERS

                                                                              July 2014

Updates in Treatment: It is Possible to Change Our DNA  
When we are born, the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in our bodies contains the blueprints for who we are and instructions for who we will become. For example, it can tell our eyes to eventually turn from blue at birth to hazel later on, our length to grow from 22 inches to 72 and direct a multitude of other changes over the course of our lives.

Many people have mistakenly believed that the DNA with which we are born is the determining factor for who we are and will become, but researchers have understood for decades that this genetic predetermination is flawed.

In recent years, Russian scientists have embarked on truly groundbreaking DNA research that has the potential to change the world and how you view your anger management/domestic violence work forever. In an astonishing experiment, these scientists proved that the human body's DNA can easily be reprogrammed by human speech. That's right: words alone can alter the expression of your DNA.

In this remarkable experiment, words and phrases were spoken and modulated on specific frequencies—and the reprogramming effect on DNA was literally shocking. It was as though these scientists had simply "cut and pasted" the desired programming onto a human DNA molecule, and in so doing they successfully repaired damaged DNA or reprogrammed the human genome altogether (Garaiev, Poponin 1992).

Epigenetics and Beyond
The field of epigenetics refers to the science that studies how the development, functioning and evolution of biological systems are influenced by forces operating outside the DNA sequence, including intracellular, environmental and energetic influences.

Since the 1950s scientists have accepted that epigenetic influence is critical in our development. "Epi" -- Greek for "besides" -- combines with the word "genetics" to essentially mean "something more than genetics." That "something more" is widely held today to refer to our environment, thus meaning that our genetic code and the environment in which we develop determine who and what we are.

Researchers have shown through studies that epigenetics entails even more than DNA and the places where we live, the climate around us and all the twists, turns and hard knocks of our lives.

In your body, you have "epigenes" that attach to your cells. These epigenes have control over and above the genes (or DNA) inside your cells. To say it differently, your genes are the "hardware" and your epigenes are the "software" that tell them what to do.

Epigenetic scientists are now documenting how anyone can use epigenetics to "rewrite" the way their genes express themselves.

By harnessing the power of epigenetics, you can create a conscious channel of communication with your DNA through spoken words, phrases and frequencies and escape from being a "victim" of inheriting or developing abnormal genes. Instead you can change those genes to eradicate disease and pass on normal genes to the next generation.

HeartMath
A recent study from the Institute of HeartMath has shed startling results that challenge what we thought we knew about DNA. In the study, human DNA was placed in a sealed test tube. Test subjects who were trained to generate focused feelings were able to intentionally cause a change in the shape of the DNA.

Negative emotions such as anger and anxiety, produced at will, caused the two strands that comprise human DNA to wind more tightly. Heart-centered feelings of love and gratitude generated by the research subjects caused the DNA strands to unwind and exhibit positive changes in just two minutes.

This may be the first scientific evidence of the long-held theory that emotion greatly affects our quality of life. This is proof positive that DNA and health are related, and we can communicate with and "program" our DNA through emotion -- and thus, change the very blueprint of our health and our life. If we can influence the behavior of DNA and health in a test tube, what untold health benefits might we experience by changing the DNA in our bodies?

Changing DNA through Intention
The power of intentional thoughts and emotions goes beyond theory at the Institute of HeartMath. In another study, researchers have tested this idea and proven its veracity.

Researchers have gone so far as to show that physical aspects of DNA strands could be influenced by human intention. The article, "Modulation of DNA Conformation by Heart-Focused Intention" (McCraty, Atkinson, Tomasino, 2003), describes experiments that achieved such results.

For example, an individual holding three DNA samples was directed to generate heart coherence -- a beneficial state of mental, emotional and physical balance and harmony -- with the aid of a HeartMath technique that utilizes heart breathing and intentional positive emotions. The individual succeeded, as instructed, to intentionally and simultaneously unwind two of the DNA samples to different extents and leave the third unchanged.

"The results provide experimental evidence to support the hypothesis that aspects of the DNA molecule can be altered through intentionality," the article states. "The data indicate that when individuals are in a heart-focused, loving state and in a more coherent mode of physiological functioning, they have a greater ability to alter the conformation of DNA.

"Individuals capable of generating high ratios of heart coherence were able to alter DNA conformation according to their intention . . Control group participants showed low ratios of heart coherence and were unable to intentionally alter the conformation of DNA."

For more information go to:

The Coherent Heart Heart-Brain Interactions, Psychophysiological Coherence, and the Emergence of System-Wide Order by Rollin McCraty, Ph.D., Mike Atkinson, Dana Tomasino, B.A., and Raymond Trevor Bradley, Ph.D.


 
Last Chance to Get In on the Ground Floor -- Certified Domestic Violence Specialist-I Credential  
Domestic Violence Specialist-I Certification 2-Day Seminar, July 19 & 20, 2014, Westin Bristol Place Airport Hotel, Toronto, Canada


The initial training event for the CDVS-I credential will take place this summer in delightful Toronto, Canada at the Westin Bristol Place Airport Hotel. Dr. Ron Potter-Efron and Pat Potter-Efron will lead this ground breaking event. This certification training is open to anyone holding a minimum of the CAMS-I credential. Here is the daily schedule of topics to be covered:

Day One:
Motivation 
Description: Why are you interested in this area? What are your personal experiences with domestic violence? What is your concept of "offenders"? What is your concept of "victims"?

History of DV Treatment and Current Approaches
Description: The power and control model; evidence-based protocols; gender similarities and differences; justifications for individual and group treatment; considerations for eventual couples' therapy. Anger/domestic violence connections.

Assessment of Clients' Capacity for Domestic Aggression 
Description: Lecture with handouts. Use of available tools to assess appropriateness for treatment and likelihood of domestic violence; follow-up tools after treatment to assess effectiveness of treatment.

The Most Critical Concept: Safety First
Description: Channeling all work toward physical safety; concept of psychological safety; communication with shelters; restraining orders/no contact orders; legal and ethical considerations; the community as client; working with the courts and probation departments; awareness of possible effects of early traumatization, child abuse and neglect upon offenders.

Levels and Types of Aggression 
Description: Types of anger and domestic violence. The varieties of power and control; varieties of anger/aggression including passive aggression, etc.; sexual abuse as an aspect of domestic violence. Rage as distinct from anger.

Shelter and Victim Witness Speakers
Description: Extending awareness of effects of domestic violence upon recipients and witnesses of domestic violence. Guest speakers.

Brain Change and its Relevance to Domestic Violence Offender Treatment
Description: Presentation of a domestic violence offender treatment program specifically designed around brain change concepts.

Day Two:
Levels of Treatment and Topics in Groups
Description: Presentation of two levels of domestic violence offender treatment: 10-session vs. 50-session programs. Gender specific differences in programming topics. Necessary and optional topics to present in groups.

Presentation of Personal Brain Change Plans
Description: Presentation of personal brain change plans as preparation for running this program.

Developing Positive Directions for Clients
Description: Instilling hope; rewarding success; improving self-worth; working with clients' strengths.

Adapting Standard Anger Management Techniques to Domestic Violence Offender Treatment
Description: The need to adapt standard anger management techniques to situations relevant to domestic violence offenders.

Shame and Shame-Based Rage as Predictors of Domestic Violence
Description: Discussion of two concerns highly correlated with domestic violence.

Increasing Client Empathy
Description: Emphasis upon teaching participants how to help clients improve this critical skill.

Related Issues
Description: Attachment, jealousy and insecurity as predictors of domestic violence; alcohol/drug abuse; depression; anxiety; brain damage, etc.

Alternatives to Violence
Discussion: Important positive directions to help clients move beyond domestic violence and aggression. Topics include respectful relationships, positive parenting.

Wrap-up
Description: Final concerns and questions; certification procedures, etc.



 
Call for Presentations and Posters  
2015 NAMA International Conference, Anger, Aggression, and Violence
March 12-13, 2015
Chicago IL, USA

Submission of Presentation proposal will be accepted for consideration using this format:
bulletPresentation type: lecture, poster, etc.
bulletPresenters: credentials, specialty, publications (include CV)
bulletTitle: how this presentation relates to overall conference topics
bulletAbstract: 50 words or less

Topics
Presentation proposals are invited from anger management, domestic violence, and academic professionals. Topics of interest for submissions include, but are not limited to:
bulletTrauma care, Innovations in treatment of anger, aggression, and violence
bulletCommunity practice models
bulletEvidence-based practice
bulletCultural Concerns
bulletUse of alternative models of treatment
bulletFamily Therapy Focus in anger management and domestic violence
bulletUse of group anger management and domestic violence treatment
bulletAnger management work with high risk populations
bulletBuilding a successful private practice
bulletImpact of spirituality/religion on care and recovery
bulletCommunity Preparedness
bulletImpact of war on community, individuals, and families
bulletTreatment in alternative settings
bulletValue of relationships in care

Inquiries: namass@namass.org 
Web address:
http://www.namass.org/conference2015.htm
Co-Sponsored by: NAMA and the Midwest Chapter of NAMA

 
Book Review: Anger Management: The Complete Treatment Guidebook for Practitioners  
Authors:
bulletHoward Kassinove, Ph.D., NAMA Distinguished Diplomate, board-certified clinical psychologist, is chairperson of the Psychology Department at Hofstra University.
bulletRaymond Chip Tafrate, Ph.D., NAMA Distinguished Diplomate, is a professor in the Criminology and Criminal Justice Department at Central Connecticut State University.

Review by Charles M. Davis, M.D., who is affiliated with Central State Hospital in Petersburg, Virginia.

This book aims to serve as a broadly based clinical guide for ameliorating the experience of anger as well as behaviors that result from anger. Although many publications share this goal, Anger Management: The Complete Treatment Guidebook for Practitioners gives the reader a useful toolkit that reaches beyond the scope of some older treatments of anger and its management. Each of the book's seven sections contains between one and five chapters that range from considerations of basic conceptualizations of anger and anger management principles through the process of change. The book explains how changes in behavior are preceded by increases in awareness and motivation and are followed by maturation of attitude and personal philosophy. The transitions between sections and chapters are smooth. The clinical material is well rounded, with particularly astute commentary on personality factors, interpersonal dynamics, and the role and management of anger within and outside the client-treater relationship. The book is also generously referenced, facilitating further pursuit of the topic from various viewpoints.

The book's authors, Howard Kassinove, Ph.D., and Raymond Chip Tafrate, Ph.D., exceed expectations with humor and charm, prefacing chapters with a variety of quotations from sources ranging from the Buddha to Fred Allen. With the understanding and enthusiasm of excellent teachers, these authors lead the reader through a labyrinth of relevant and substantive material. I found no real shortcomings in this book and highly recommend it to every treatment professional. Far more than a simple anger management handbook, this work has the depth and readability to expand the reader's appreciation of anger in its many guises.

 
The Partner Abuse State of Knowledge Project -- Review Findings Summary  
The following are some findings-at-a glance from thePartner Abuse State of Knowledge Project -- a comprehensive 2,300 page review of the domestic violence research literature published in November 2012 by the journal Partner Abuse -http://www.springerpub.com/.

Prevalence of Partner Abuse

Victimization

Overall, 24% of individuals are assaulted by a partner at least once in their lifetime (23% for females and 19.3% for males)

Higher overall rates among dating students

Higher victimization for male than female high school students

Lifetime rates higher among women than men

Past year rates somewhat higher among men

Higher rates of intimate partner violence (IPV) among younger, dating populations "highlights the need for school-based IPV prevention and intervention efforts"


Perpetration

Overall, 25.3% of individuals have perpetrated IPV

Rates of female-perpetrated violence higher than male-perpetrated (28.3% vs. 21.6%)

Wide range in perpetration rates: 1.0% to 61.6% for males, 2.4% to 68.9% for women

Range of findings due to variety of samples and operational definitions of PV

Emotional Abuse and Control

80% of individuals have perpetrated emotional abuse

Emotional abuse categorized as either expressive (in response to a provocation) or coercive (intended to monitor, control and/or threaten)

Across studies, 40% of women and 32% of men reported expressive abuse; 41% of women and 43% of men reported coercive abuse

According to national samples, 0.2% of men and 4.5% of women have been forced to have sexual intercourse by a partner

4.1% to 8% of women and 0.5% to 2% of men report at least one incident of stalking during their lifetime

Intimate stalkers comprise somewhere between one-third and one-half of all stalkers

Within studies of stalking and obsessive behaviors, gender differences are much less when all types of obsessive pursuit behaviors are considered, but more skewed toward female victims when the focus is on physical stalking

Motivation

Male and female IPV perpetrated from similar motives -- primarily to get back at a partner for emotionally hurting them, because of stress or jealousy, to express anger and other feelings that they could not put into words or communicate, and to get their partner's attention.

Eight studies directly compared men and women in the power/control motive and subjected their findings to statistical analyses. Three reported no significant gender differences, and one had mixed findings. One paper found that women were more motivated to perpetrate violence as a result of power/control than were men, and three found that men were more motivated; however, gender differences were weak.

Of the ten papers containing gender-specific statistical analyses, five indicated that women were significantly more likely to report self-defense as a motive for perpetration than men. Four papers did not find statistically significant gender differences, and one paper reported that men were more likely to report this motive than women. Authors point out that it might be particularly difficult for highly masculine males to admit to perpetrating violence in self-defense, as this admission implies vulnerability.

Self-defense was endorsed in most samples by only a minority of respondents, male and female. For non-perpetrator samples, the rates of self-defense reported by men ranged from 0% to 21%, and for women the range was 5% to 35%. The highest rates of reported self-defense motives (50% for men, 65.4% for women) came from samples of perpetrators, who may have reasons to overestimate this motive.

None of the studies reported that anger/retaliation was significantly more of a motive for men's than women's violence; instead, two papers indicated that anger was more likely to be a motive for women's violence as compared to men.

 
Did You Know . .  
know
  1. Adjusted for overall inflation, the cost of an average round-trip airline ticket fell 50% from 1978 to 2011, according to Airlines for America.
  2. According to the Census Bureau, the average new home now has more bathrooms than occupants.
  3. According to the Census Bureau, in 1900 there was one housing unit for every five Americans. Today, there's one for every three. In 1910 the average home had 1.13 occupants per room. By 1997 it was down to 0.42 occupants per room.
  4. According to Professor Julian Simon, the average American house or apartment is twice as large as the average house or apartment in Japan, and three times larger than the average home or apartment in Russia.
  5. Relative to hourly wages, the cost of an average new car has fallen fourfold since 1915, according to Professor Julian Simon.
  6. Google Maps is free. If you think about this for a few moments, it's really astounding. It's probably the single most useful piece of software ever invented, and it's free for anyone to use.
  7. High school graduation rates are at a 40-year high, according to Education Week.
  8. The death rate from strokes has declined by 75% since the 1960s, according to the National Institutes of Health. Death from heart attacks has plunged, too: If the heart attack survival rate had not declined since the 1960s, the number of Americans dying each year from heart disease would be more than 1 million higher than it currently is.
  9. In 1900, African-Americans had an illiteracy rate of nearly 45%, according to the Census Bureau. Today, it's statistically close to zero.
  10. People talk about how expensive college is today, but a century ago fewer than one in 20 Americans ever stepped foot in a university. College wasn't an option at any price for some minorities because of segregation just six decades ago.

 
About NAMA
 
The National Anger Management Association is an independent, non-profit, professional organization for the advancement of anger management services, research, and the professional anger management specialist community. All active National Anger Management Association members are listed in the NAMA Online Directory. Fellow members are listed above Members and Diplomate members are listed above Fellows.

If you are not a member, find out more and apply online. If your membership has expired, you can renew your membership on your website.

Membership dues reminder notice goes to your email. If your email address is not correct, please update or send it to us at namass@namass.org.

The NAMA LinkedIn Group provides a place for anger management professionals to share content, find answers, post and view jobs, make contacts, and establish themselves as industry experts.

June 2014

Study Suggests: Arguing A Lot - Just Might Kill You!  
It gets worse: Just worrying often can shorten your life, too.

Unreasonable boss or colleagues? Challenging children? Defensive or demanding friends or family? If it sometimes feels like these stressors are killing you, new research suggests you just may be correct.

Middle-aged adults who frequently argued with their husband or wife were more than twice as likely to die at a relatively young age compared with people who rarely fought, according to a study published this month in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Frequent confrontations with friends were even more hazardous - people who fell into this category were 2.6 times more likely to die prematurely than people who got along with their companions. Worst of all were persistent arguments with neighbors, the researchers found. These types of difficult people were more than three times more likely to die prematurely than the more flexible, adaptive, and stable types.

Even when fights didn't break out into the open, simply worrying about friends or loved ones or ruminating over their demands could be enough to shorten one's life. People who "always" or "often" fretted about their spouse were almost twice as likely to die during the course of the study as those who seldom fretted. In addition, those who expended lots of negative mental energy on their children were 55 percent more likely to die prematurely as those who didn't worry about their kids very often."As a result of this information, FSC respectfully asks that the Courts consider ordering violators with serious traffic offenses to attend 'live' classes only."

All these associations between stressful social relations and the risk of early death were stronger for men than for women, the researchers found. They were also stronger for people who were not working outside the home.

The study, published May 8, 2014, was based on data from nearly 10,000 Danish adults between ages 36 and 52 in 2000. All of them answered questions about their conflicts with and worries about their partners, children, other family, friends and neighbors.

About 6 percent of them said they had frequent conflicts with their spouse, 6 percent had frequent conflicts with their children, 2 percent had frequent conflicts with other family members and 1 percent had frequent conflicts with friends. The researchers also used government health files to see how many of the study participants had died through the end of 2011. Over the 11 years of the study, 4 percent of the women and 6 percent of the men died (most often of cancer, but also doe to cardiovascular disease, alcohol abuse and accidents, among other causes).

If public-health policy makers are looking for new ways to reduce premature deaths in their communities, the research suggests offering programs for anger management.

 
Get in on the ground floor - New Domestic Violence Credential  
Domestic Violence Specialist-I Certification 2-Day Seminar, July 19 & 20, 2014, Westin Bristol Place Airport Hotel, Toronto, Canada


The initial training event for the CDVS-I credential will take place this summer in delightful Toronto, Canada at the Westin Bristol Place Airport Hotel. Dr. Ron Potter-Efron and Pat Potter-Efron will lead this ground breaking event. This Certification training is open to anyone holding a minimum of the CAMS-I credential. Here are some of the basic content topics to be discussed:
bulletSafety First and Assessment
bulletMotivation and DV Treatment and Approaches
bulletLevels and Types of Aggression and Treatment
bulletBrain Change and DV Treatment
bulletDeveloping Positive Direction for Clients
bulletAdapting Anger Management Techniques to DV Treatment
bulletIncreasing Empathy
bulletAttachment, Jealousy, and Shame as Predictors of DV
bulletAlternatives to Violence and Related Issues of Substance Abuse, Depression



 
Partner Abuse State of Knowledge Project - Findings Summary  
The following are some findings-at-a glance from the "Partner Abuse State of Knowledge Project" -- a comprehensive 2,300 page review of the domestic violence research literature published in November 2012 by the Journal of Partner Abuse.

Prevalence of Partner Abuse Victimization

Overall, 24% of individuals were assaulted by a partner at least once in their lifetime (23% for females and 19.3% for males)
bulletHigher overall rates among dating students
bulletHigher victimization for male than female high school students
bulletLifetime rates higher among women than men
bulletPast year rates somewhat higher among men
bulletHigher rates of intimate partner violence (IPV) among younger, dating populations "highlights the need for school-based IPV prevention and intervention efforts"

Perpetration
bulletOverall, 25.3% of individuals have perpetrated IPV
bulletRates of female-perpetrated violence higher than male-perpetrated (28.3% vs. 21.6%)
bulletWide range in perpetration rates: 1.0% to 61.6% for males; 2.4% to 68.9% for women,
bulletRange of findings due to variety of samples and operational definitions of PV

Emotional Abuse and Control
bullet80% of individuals have perpetrated emotional abuse
bulletEmotional abuse categorized as either expressive (in response to a provocation) or coercive (intended to monitor, control and/or threaten)
bulletAcross studies, 40% of women and 32% of men reported expressive abuse; 41% of women and 43% of men reported coercive abuse
bulletAccording to national samples, 0.2% of men and 4.5% of women have been forced to have sexual intercourse by a partner
bullet4.1% to 8% of women and 0.5% to 2% of men report at least one incident of stalking during their lifetime
bulletIntimate stalkers comprise somewhere between one-third and one half of all stalkers.
bulletWithin studies of stalking and obsessive behaviors, gender differences are much less when all types of obsessive pursuit behaviors are considered, but more skewed toward female victims when the focus is on physical stalking

Motivation

Male and female IPV perpetrated from similar motives – primarily to get back at a partner for emotionally hurting them, because of stress or jealousy, to express anger and other feelings that they could not put into words or communicate, and to get their partner's attention.

Eight studies directly compared men and women in the power/control motive and subjected their findings to statistical analyses. Three reported no significant gender differences and one had mixed findings. One paper found that women were more motivated to perpetrate violence as a result of power/control than were men, and three found that men were more motivated; however, gender differences were weak.

Of the ten papers containing gender-specific statistical analyses, five indicated that women were significantly more likely to report self-defense as a motive for perpetration than men. Four papers did not find statistically significant gender differences, and one paper reported that men were more likely to report this motive than women. Authors point out that it might be particularly difficult for highly masculine males to admit to perpetrating violence in self-defense, as this admission implies vulnerability.

Self-defense was endorsed in most samples by only a minority of respondents, male and female. For non-perpetrator samples, the rates of self-defense reported by men ranged from 0% to 21%, and for women the range was 5% to 35%. The highest rates of reported self-defense motives (50% for men, 65.4% for women) came from samples of perpetrators, who may have reasons to overestimate this motive.

None of the studies reported that anger/retaliation was significantly more of a motive for men than women's violence; instead, two papers indicated that anger was more likely to be a motive for women's violence as compared to men.

Jealousy/partner cheating seems to be a motive to perpetrate violence for both men and women.


 
Call for Presentations and Posters  
2015 NAMA International Conference, Anger, Aggression, and Violence
March 12-13, 2015
Chicago IL, USA

Submission of Presentation proposal will be accepted for consideration using this format:
bulletPresentation type: lecture, poster, etc.
bulletPresenters: credentials, specialty, publications (include CV)
bulletTitle: how this presentation relates to overall conference topics
bulletAbstract: 50 words or less

Topics
Presentation proposals are invited from anger management, domestic violence, and academic professionals. Topics of interest for submissions include, but are not limited to:
bulletTrauma care, Innovations in treatment of anger, aggression, and violence
bulletCommunity practice models
bulletEvidence-based practice
bulletCultural Concerns
bulletUse of alternative models of treatment
bulletFamily Therapy Focus in anger management and domestic violence
bulletUse of group anger management and domestic violence treatment
bulletAnger management work with high risk populations
bulletBuilding a successful private practice
bulletImpact of spirituality/religion on care and recovery
bulletCommunity Preparedness
bulletImpact of war on community, individuals, and families
bulletTreatment in alternative settings
bulletValue of relationships in care

Inquiries: namass@namass.org 
Web address:
http://www.namass.org/conference2015.htm
Co-Sponsored by: NAMA and the Midwest Chapter of NAMA

 
Book Review: Being Wrong – by Kathryn Schulz  
Review by Rich Pfeiffer

To err is to wander and wandering is the way we discover the world and lost in thought it is the also the way we discover ourselves. Being right might be gratifying but in the end it is static a mere statement. Being wrong is hard and humbling and sometimes even dangerous but in the end it is a journey and a story. Who really wants to stay at home and be right when you can don your armor spring up on your steed and go forth to explore the world. True, you might get lost along get stranded in a swamp, have a scare at the edge of a cliff, thieves might steal your gold, brigands might imprison you in a cave, sorcerers might turn you into a toad but what of what. To fu*k up is to find adventure: it is in the spirit that this book is written.
-- Kathryn Schulz, Being Wrong

In Being Wrong, journalist Kathryn Schulz explores why we find it so gratifying to be right and so distasteful to be mistaken, and how this attitude toward error corrodes our relationships with anger -- whether between family members, colleagues, neighbors, or nations. Along the way, she takes us on a fascinating tour of human fallibility, from wrongful convictions to no-fault divorce, medical mistakes to misadventures at sea, failed prophecies to false memories, "I told you so!" to "Mistakes were made." Drawing on thinkers as varied as Augustine, Darwin, Freud, Gertrude Stein, Alan Greenspan, and Groucho Marx, she proposes a new way of looking at wrongness. In this view, error is both a given and a gift – one that can transform our worldviews, our relationships, and, most profoundly, ourselves.

In the end, Being Wrong is not just an account of human error but a tribute to human creativity -- to the ways we generate and revise our beliefs about ourselves and the world. At a moment when economic, political, and religious dogmatism increasingly divide us, Schulz explores the seduction of certainty and the crisis occasioned by error with uncommon humor and eloquence. A brilliant debut from a new voice in nonfiction, this book calls on us to ask one of life's most challenging questions: what if I'm wrong?

TED talk: On Being Wrong - Kathryn Shultz
http://www.ted.com/talks/kathryn_schulz_on_being_wrong

 
Did You Know . .  
know
  1. Two percent of American homes had electricity in 1900. J.P. Morgan (the man) was one of the first to install electricity in his home, and it required a private power plant on his property. Even by 1950, close to 30% of American homes didn't have electricity. It wasn't until the 1970s that virtually all homes were powered. Adjusted for wage growth, electricity cost more than 10 times as much in 1900 as it does today, according to professor Julian Simon.
  2. According to the Federal Reserve, the number of lifetime years spent in leisure -- retirement plus time off during your working years -- rose from 11 years in 1870 to 35 years by 1990. Given the rise in life expectancy, it's probably close to 40 years today. Which is amazing: The average American spends nearly half his life in leisure. If you had told this to the average American 100 years ago, that person would have considered you wealthy beyond imagination.
  3. We are having a national discussion about whether a $7.25-per-hour minimum wage is too low. But even adjusted for inflation, the minimum wage was less than $4 per hour as recently as the late 1940s. The top 1% has captured most of the wage growth over the past three decades, but nearly everyone has grown richer -- much richer -- during the past seven decades.
  4. In 1952, 38,000 people contracted polio in America alone, according to the Centers for Disease Control. In 2012, there were fewer than 300 reported cases of polio in the entire world.
  5. From 1920 to 1949, an average of 433,000 people died each year globally from "extreme weather events." That figure has plunged to 27,500 per year, according to Indur Goklany of the International Policy Network, largely thanks to "increases in societies' collective adaptive capacities."
  6. Worldwide deaths from battle have plunged from 300 per 100,000 people during World War II, to the low teens during the 1970s, to less than 10 in the 1980s, to less than one in the 21st century, according to Harvard professor Steven Pinker. "War really is going out of style," he says.
  7. Median household income adjusted for inflation was around $25,000 per year during the 1950s. It's nearly double that amount today. We have false nostalgia about the prosperity of the 1950s because our definition of what counts as "middle class" has been inflated -- the 34% rise in the size of the median American home in just the past 25 years. If you dig into how the average "prosperous" American family lived in the 1950s, I think you'll find a standard of living we'd call "poverty" today.
  8. Reported rape per 100,000 Americans dropped from 42.3 in 1991 to 27.5 in 2010, according to the FBI. Robbery has dropped from 272 per 100,000 in 1991 to 119 in 2010. There were nearly 4 million fewer property crimes in 2010 than there were in 1991, which is amazing when you consider the U.S. population grew by 60 million during that period.
  9. According to the Census Bureau, only one in 10 American homes had air conditioning in 1960. That rose to 49% in 1973, and 89% today -- the 11% that don't are mostly in cold climates. Simple improvements like this have changed our lives in immeasurable ways.
  10. Almost no homes had a refrigerator in 1900, according to Frederick Lewis Allan's The Big Change, let alone a car. Today they sell cars with refrigerators in them.

 
About NAMA
 
he National Anger Management Association is an independent, non-profit, professional organization for the advancement of anger management services, research, and the professional anger management specialist community. All active National Anger Management Association members are listed in the NAMA Online Directory. Fellow members are listed above Members and Diplomate members are listed above Fellows.

If you are not a member, find out more and apply online. If your membership has expired, you can renew your membership on your website.

Membership dues reminder notice goes to your email. If your email address is not correct, please update or send it to us at namass@namass.org.

The NAMA LinkedIn Group provides a place for anger management professionals to share content, find answers, post and view jobs, make contacts, and establish themselves as industry experts.

May 2014

Regarding Live vs. Online Classes and Programs  
The National Anger Management Association continues to monitor trends that influence courts and state governmental agencies responsible for setting standards for anger management and domestic violence programs. The following is a recent letter to the courts by Jim Meade, Executive Director, Florida Safety Council. While it does not specifically mention either anger management or domestic violence programs, it represents a noticeably growing trend questioning the efficacy of online classes.

"The Florida Safety Council's (FSC) mission is 'To reduce preventable injuries and deaths by developing and distributing superior safety and health programs, training and products.' Over the past decade, FSC has witnessed a strong trend of traffic safety training programs shifting from 'live' classroom courses to online computer courses. Before continuing, it should be noted that FSC offers both versions of these approved training programs; however, we believe 'live' classes to be the more effective driver training classes of the two delivery systems offered by many traffic schools throughout the area.

"In reviewing FSC's dual offering of 'live' and online state approved traffic safety courses, we found that the recidivism rate for returning students is fast becoming significantly higher for students who take courses online. Knowing that the curriculums are similar in both content and price, and both are approved by DHSMV, we looked into factors that have contributed to the higher recidivism rate with our online clients. In order to obtain that information, we questioned over two hundred new and returning students that have taken either our 'live' or online classes, and in some cases both.

"We learned that the primary reason the Internet courses were preferred, was convenience. The ability to take the course at a time and place favorable to the student's schedule far outweighed other considerations. However, most students found the online courses to be boring, failed to answer specific questions, and in many cases felt the courses insulted their intelligence since they are written on an eighth grade learning level, as required by DHSMV. These students would finish each section quickly and be required to wait before the next section would open up as each session requires specific amounts of time before it can advance, thus they frequently became bored, disengaged and lost interest in the courses.

"Most of those interviewed who have taken both the Internet and 'live' classroom course on the same topic, preferred the 'live' class because of the interaction with the instructor and classmates, and found more detailed traffic safety information was discussed. We found that in the 'live' class, the student's retention level exceeded what they remembered of their online course. As there are few safeguards, we also found a startling number of students who admitted that they had another person take the online course for them. "As a result of this information, FSC respectfully asks that the Courts consider ordering violators with serious traffic offenses to attend 'live' classes only."

 
New Domestic Violence Credential  
Domestic Violence Specialist-I Certification 2-Day Seminar, July 19 & 20, 2014, Westin Bristol Place Airport Hotel, Toronto, Canada

The initial training event for the CDVS-I credential will take place this summer in delightful Toronto, Canada at the Westin Bristol Place Airport Hotel. Dr. Ron Potter-Efron and Pat Potter-Efron will lead this ground breaking event. This Certification training is open to anyone holding a minimum of the CAMS-I credential. Here are some of the basic content topics to be discussed:
bulletSafety First and Assessment
bulletMotivation and DV Treatment and Approaches
bulletLevels and Types of Aggression and Treatment
bulletBrain Change and DV Treatment
bulletDeveloping Positive Direction for Clients
bulletAdapting Anger Management Techniques to DV Treatment
bulletIncreasing Empathy
bulletAttachment, Jealousy, and Shame as Predictors of DV
bulletAlternatives to Violence and Related Issues of Substance Abuse, Depression



 
Call for Presentations and Posters  
2015 NAMA International Conference, Anger, Aggression, and Violence
March 12-13, 2015
Chicago IL, USA

Submission of Presentation proposal will be accepted for consideration using this format:
bulletPresentation type: lecture, poster, etc.
bulletPresenters: credentials, specialty, publications (include CV)
bulletTitle: how this presentation relates to overall conference topics
bulletAbstract: 50 words or less

Topics
Presentation proposals are invited from anger management, domestic violence, and academic professionals. Topics of interest for submissions include, but are not limited to:
bulletTrauma care, Innovations in treatment of anger, aggression, and violence
bulletCommunity practice models
bulletEvidence-based practice
bulletCultural Concerns
bulletUse of alternative models of treatment
bulletFamily Therapy Focus in anger management and domestic violence
bulletUse of group anger management and domestic violence treatment
bulletAnger management work with high risk populations
bulletBuilding a successful private practice
bulletImpact of spirituality/religion on care and recovery
bulletCommunity Preparedness
bulletImpact of war on community, individuals, and families
bulletTreatment in alternative settings
bulletValue of relationships in care

Inquiries: namass@namass.org 
Web address:
http://www.namass.org/conference2015.htm
Co-Sponsored by: NAMA and the Midwest Chapter of NAMA

 
Book Review: The Dance of Anger by Harriet Lerner, PhD  
Review by Rich Pfeiffer


"Anger is a signal and one worth listening to. Our anger may be a message that we are being hurt, that our rights are being violated, that our needs or wants are not being adequately met, or simply that something is not right. Our anger may tell us that we are not addressing an important emotional issue in our lives, or that too much of the self – our beliefs, values, desires or ambitions – is being compromised in a relationship. Our anger may be a signal that we are doing more and giving more than we can comfortably do or give. Or our anger may warn us that others are doing too much for us, at the expense of our own competence and growth." — Dance of Anger, p.1

Synopsis: Lerner, a NAMA Distinguished Diplomate, in her groundbreaking work (1985) takes a look at anger: how it hurts us when we avoid it or express it in the wrong way. The "circle" of the title refers to the useless patterns of arguing people fall into, creating an endless circle where nothing ever actually gets changed by anger. We stand on the shoulders of giants . .

Why you should read this book: Lerner's main point is one that many people find difficult to recognize or to act on -- we have the same arguments with the same people over and over and over in our lives because we don't know how to change anything. Her advice is simple but challenging: change your own behavior instead of trying to change the other person, which breaks the "circle" and hopefully eventually forces the other person to change their methods as well, allowing positive change to emerge from anger and arguing.

Opening paragraph: (See above) "Our anger may tell us that we are not addressing an important emotional issue in our lives, or that too much of our self -- our beliefs, values, desires, or ambitions -- is being compromised in a relationship. Our anger may be a signal that we are doing more and giving more than we can comfortably do or give. Or our anger may warn us that others are doing too much for us, at the expense of our own competence and growth. Just as physical pain tells us to take our hand off the hot stove, the pain of our anger preserves the very integrity of our self. Our anger can motivate us to say 'no' to the ways in which we are defined by others and 'yes' to the dictates of our inner self."

Fabulous quote: "What happens if there is not enough 'I' in our relationship? Here, we sacrifice our clear and separate identity and our sense of responsibility for, and control over, our own life. When the 'togetherness force' is overriding, a lot of energy goes into trying to 'be for' the other person, and trying to make the other person think or behave differently. Instead of taking responsibility for our own selves, we tend to feel responsible for the emotional well-being of the other person and hold the other person responsible for ours. When this reversal of individual responsibility is set in motion, each partner may become very emotionally reactive to what the other says and does, and there may be a lot of fighting and blaming…"


 
The Neural Components of Empathy  
empathyA recent study published in the Social Cognitive & Affective Neuroscience Journal (Oxford Press) suggests that there are several neurocognitive components involved in different aspects of empathy. First, limbic regions are involved in affective congruence, supporting an emotional state that complements that of the target. Second, the mirror and mentalizing systems represent two pathways to sharing others' emotions and are differentially engaged depending on the amount of context that is provided to understand another's emotional experience. Finally, septal area appears to play a role in generating prosocial motivation during empathy more generally. In particular, the septal area may produce an other-focused, caregiving state of mind that motivates prosocial behavior.

Overall, these results shed new light on past empathy research and add to an increasingly comprehensive neural model for empathy. The current findings suggest that the target's specific emotions will stimulate congruent emotions in the observer, such as negative affect when experiencing empathy for negative emotions and positive affect when experiencing empathy for positive emotions. In addition, empathy may be induced by simply observing others' emotional experiences, but at other times it may be necessary to actively take the target's perspective in order to understand and connect with their emotions. Finally, empathy heightens our focus on and concern for others, regardless of what specific emotion the target is experiencing, and motivates us to behave prosocially. (Full study available atwww.medscape.com/viewarticle/818664_print )

 
Did You Know . .  
know
  1. U.S. life expectancy at birth was 39 years in 1800, 49 years in 1900, 68 years in 1950, and 79 years today. The average newborn today can expect to live an entire generation longer than his great-grandparents could.
  2. A flu pandemic in 1918 infected 500 million people and killed as many as 100 million. In his book The Great Influenza, John Barry describes the illness as if "someone were hammering a wedge into your skull just behind the eyes, and body aches so intense they felt like bones breaking." Today, you can go to Safeway and get a flu shot. It costs 15 bucks. You might feel a little poke.
  3. In 1950, 23 people per 100,000 Americans died each year in traffic accidents, according to the Census Bureau. That fell to 11 per 100,000 by 2009. If the traffic mortality rate had not declined, 37,800 more Americans would have died last year than actually did. In the time it will take you to read this article, one American is alive who would have died in a car accident 60 years ago.
  4. In 1949, Popular Mechanics magazine made the bold prediction that someday a computer could weigh less than 1 ton. I wrote this sentence on an iPad that weighs 0.73 pounds.
  5. The average American now retires at age 62. One hundred years ago, the average American died at age 51. Enjoy your golden years -- your ancestors didn't get any of them.
  6. In his 1770's book The Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith wrote: "It is not uncommon in the highlands of Scotland for a mother who has borne 20 children not to have 2 alive." Infant mortality in America has dropped from 58 per 1,000 births in 1933 to less than six per 1,000 births in 2010, according to the World Health Organization. There are about 11,000 births in America each day, so this improvement means more than 200,000 infants now survive each year who wouldn't have 80 years ago. That's like adding a city the size of Boise, Idaho, every year.
  7. America averaged 20,919 murders per year in the 1990s, and 16,211 per year in the 2000s, according to the FBI. If the murder rate had not fallen, 47,000 more Americans would have been killed in the last decade than actually were. That's more than the population of Biloxi, Miss.
  8. Despite a surge in airline travel, there were half as many fatal plane accidents in 2012 than there were in 1960, according to the Aviation Safety Network.
  9. No one has died from a new nuclear weapon attack since 1945. If you went back to 1950 and asked the world's smartest political scientists, they would have told you the odds of seeing that happen would be close to 0%. You don't have to be very imaginative to think that the most important news story of the past 70 years is what didn't happen. Congratulations, world.
  10. Two percent of American homes had electricity in 1900. J.P Morgan (the man) was one of the first to install electricity in his home, and it required a private power plant on his property. Even by 1950, close to 30% of American homes didn't have electricity. It wasn't until the 1970s that virtually all homes were powered. Adjusted for wage growth, electricity cost more than 10 times as much in 1900 as it does today, according to professor Julian Simon.

 

 

February 2014

Anger and Shootings
 
shooterShootings in public places are now so frequent in the United States that they are almost commonplace. Last week's shooting of two young store clerks at a skateboard shop in the Columbia Mall in DC is still under investigation. Clearly, the state of mind of the 19-year-old shooter is key to understanding this monstrous violence. As professionals in the field of mental health, we must ask ourselves the role that anger management could play in preventing future shootings.

Let's look at the mid-December attempted murder of high school librarian Tracy Murphy at Arapahoe High School in Centennial, Colorado. He was an adult adviser of the speech and debate team. He allegedly demoted or removed one of the students, Karl Pierson, from the team. According to the Daily Mail and Guardian*, "Pierson's friend and fellow debate team member has said that he was upset about being demoted and his anger resulted in an even more serious suspension from the team. 'Karl half-jokingly threatened to kill Mr Murphy, and Mr Murphy got him suspended for saying that,' Pierson's friend and teammate Joe Redmond told The New York Daily News. 'Karl wanted to go to the Air Force Academy and they don't look positively on suspensions so (Karl) felt like Mr Murphy had ruined his life.'" The high school senior was only suspended from the team, not from school. On December 13, he attended classes. At 12:30 PM, he donned a mask and black hoodie, and marched through the school brandishing a shotgun and shouting "Mr. Murphy! Mr. Murphy!" Someone warned Murphy and the librarian hustled out of the school to draw the shooter away. One female student confronted Pierson; she was shot and later died of her injuries. Pierson committed suicide.

The news media gathered facts and quotes in an attempt to comprehend Pierson's motives and state of mind. Here are a few:

From The Denver Channel ABC 7:+ A student named Max Minnie "said the senior had a combative personality. 'He was always the type that wanted to be right. He would always argue with the teacher about scholastic things, whatever we were talking about he always had something to say. Never wanted anyone to tell him he was wrong. I definitely noticed that in the classes I was in with him,' Minne said. 'He spoke intelligently, he's a smart guy, I think he did pretty well in school, he was just kinda weird. ... He wasn't a violent person, he was just verbally aggressive.'

"Pierson's neighbor said he was quiet and seemed like a nice boy but they didn't really know him well. 'It's really sad. It's unfortunate that he'd be so upset about being kicked off the debate team that he'd do something like this and it's unfortunate he'd have access to a weapon to be able to do something like this,' said neighbor Randy Freitik.

"Minee said Pierson had been sent to the administration office earlier this week for yelling at teacher because he thought he got locked out of the class."

From The Huffington Post:** "'Speech and debate was his life, and the fact that he wasn't there crushed him a little bit and made him really tense and angry,' Arapahoe High School debate team co-captain Joe Redmond told NBC News. Redmond said that Pierson and Murphy 'did not get along, and whatever it was escalated to a death threat.' Redmond also said Pierson had been reading The Anarchist Cookbook,' a 1971 bomb-making manual."

Dr Ron Potter-Efron, a NAMA Distinguished Diplomate, CAMS-V and author, has identified various forms of "rage" which is helpful in our developing more effective assessment, treatment, and understanding of this shooting phenomenon. He writes, "Seething Rage - People seethe often without anybody realizing how furious about life they are. Then they sometimes explode in a hail of gunfire, going on mass shooting rampages. The best approach here is to get people to discuss their resentments before they build up into hatreds. Seethers need help learning to let go of the past and get into the present. Forgiveness work helps with some people but it is a long-term process. Also, they need to direct their fury in some effective direction such as politics or advocacy." NAMA has scheduled the 2015 International Conference on 'Anger, Aggression, and Violence' for us to focus on emerging solutions to this pressing societal problem. The dates are March 12-13, 2015. Stay tuned . .

Rich Pfeiffer, President, Board of Directors, NAMA



 
NAMA Responding to Global Demand for Anger Management Services  
globalThe need and demand for anger management services has never been greater in local communities. NAMA's highest priority is to support those members who are working in the trenches, so to speak. At the same time, NAMA is receiving a great deal of interest from people outside of the United States. The Japan Chapter of NAMA is growing quickly and we now have a couple of CAMS-I individuals in China; and other Asian countries have shown interest in affiliation. We have interested Chapter representatives in the Republic of Georgia, West Africa, and Western Europe who are in the process of affiliation with NAMA. We also have certified specialists working in Canada, Curacao, Italy, Mexico, Singapore, the UK, and AE US Military Service around the globe.


 
Domestic Violence Specialist-I Certification (CDVS-I) is Here!Get More Information.  
The NAMA - Certified Domestic Violence Specialist-I credential has been developed in response to the increased call for accessible and effective Domestic Violence services. All NAMA Domestic Violence Specialist certifications will require a minimum pre-requisite of the NAMA Certified Anger Management Specialist-I (CAMS-I) credential.

The NAMA Certified Domestic Violence Specialist standardization offers professionals, schools, hospitals, agencies, community workers and organizations an opportunity to expand their services by including Domestic Violence programs.

Domestic Violence Specialist-I Certification 2-Day Seminar, July 19 & 20, 2014, Toronto, Canada

The initial training event for the CDVS-I credential will take place this summer in delightful Toronto, Canada (Mayor Who?) at the Westin Bristol Place Airport Hotel. Dr. Ron Potter-Efron and Pat Potter-Efron will lead the ground breaking event. This Certification training is open to anyone holding a minimum of the CAMS-I credential. Here are some of the basic content topics to be discussed:
bulletSafety First and Assessment
bulletMotivation and DV Treatment and Approaches
bulletLevels and Types of Aggression and Treatment
bulletBrain Change and DV Treatment
bulletDeveloping Positive Direction for Clients
bulletAdapting Anger Management Techniques to DV Treatment
bulletIncreasing Empathy
bulletAttachment, Jealousy, and Shame as Predictors of DV
bulletAlternatives to Violence and Related Issues of Substance Abuse, Depression

 

January 2014

In with the Horse, Out with the Snake
 
zodiacI am no expert in Chinese astrology, nor sold on its scientific merit. But I have found it a useful framework for understanding the year-to-year changes in or large-scale shifts in our culture. Somehow the shift from Snake to Horse particularly speaks to me now, as I feel the shedding of old skin, and getting ready to gallop ahead in 2014. Perhaps you feel it as well. Or maybe if I describe some its contours in my life, you’ll recognize it in yours and be ready to put the energy of this New Year to the best possible use.

If you look up the Year of the Snake, you’ll read about a quiet year of preparation, laying in plans -- snake-in-the-grass sort of descriptions. But if I look at my own life, its most snake-y quality has been shed, shed, shed. My beloved wife and best friend died this past year. The hollowness of this loss influences me, even as I recognize the new space and potential it has created. Many wonderful things have also happened this year: continued growth in NAMA, and continued work with terrific colleagues and new friends and of course the closeness of family.

Enter the Year of Horse. Technically, the Chinese astrologers would tell us it doesn’t begin until the end of January. But energy doesn’t start and stop on the dime of a date, so much as shift organically and generally a month or two before we’re celebrating it. So, it’s happening right now. If you inquire into the nature of this coming year, you’ll read about spontaneity, sharp, dramatic moves, rags and riches, with good fortune going to those who can ride the wild Horse. NAMA is growing into an influential international force for cultural evolution. But what strikes me about it is just how fast it is happening.

What I remind myself of (and say to you as well) is: pay attention, sense the rhythm, and go with it completely, giving it your best. Renew and repeat. For the other thing you’d read about in the Year of the Horse or the year of any animal, is that it’s fortunate for one person and difficult for another. The animal that is too slow will especially struggle with this year. And what makes us slow? Pointing the finger at myself, it’s when I’m being stuck in old ways, comfortable in old habits, or flat out of energy. And what’s the antidote? Pay attention, sense the rhythm, and go with it, completely giving it your best. Renew and repeat.

In other words, become the Horse. Enjoy the ride!

Happy New Year!

Rich Pfeiffer, President, Board of Directors, NAMA

 
Video & Handouts from Conference Now Only $49  
conferenceVideos and handouts of the "Advances in Anger Management & Domestic Violence" Conference, Oct. 24-25, 2013, Tucson, AZ are now only $49.

Thanks to an anonymous donor, NAMA is able to offer the Conference presentations and handouts for a drastically reduced rate. Don’t miss the opportunity to access online all the significant state-of-the art information on treatments for anger management and domestic violence presented at the Conference in Tucson. Here is what is available:
bulletAnger Management in a New Era: Using Brain Science to Improve Treatment - Ron Potter -Efron, MSW, PhD
bulletDomestic Violence Offender Treatment in a New Era - Ron Potter-Efron, MSW, PhD, Pat Potter-Efron, MSW
bulletBeyond Emotional and Cognitive Intelligence: What is spiritual intelligence? - Rich Pfeiffer, MDiv, PhD
bullet7 Affective Systems: Looking closer at the Primitive Brain - Rich Pfeiffer, MDiv, PhD
bulletNew Mindfulness Techniques for Anger Management - Rich Pfeiffer, MDiv, PhD, Laura Moss, CAMS-III
bulletKeys to Defusing Anger and Hostility in Marriage - Lynette Hoy, , NCC, LCPC, CAMS-IV, Steve Yeschek, LCSW
bulletYield Theory of Anger Management – Christian Conte, PhD
bulletLegal Implications for Anger Management – David Hoy, Attorney at Law

 
How NAMA Supports You and Your Practice  
welcome 2014As we start off the New Year, NAMA is gearing up to be of even more support in your efforts to offer the most effective anger management services in the field of anger management.

Did you know?
bulletNAMA is the largest and most reputable professional association in the field.
bulletNAMA provides you with the most recognized credential in the field.
bulletThe NAMA Anger Management Specialist Directory is a very popular source of referrals and credential checks. The Directory helps people find you when they search for anger management services on Google, etc.
bulletYour profile listing in the NAMA Anger Management Specialist Directory is given priority (listed higher) when you upgrade your active membership to Fellow or Diplomate.
bulletYou can purchase all the videos and handouts from the NAMA 2013 Advances in Anger Management and Domestic Violence Conference for only $49 here.
bulletYou may use your designated NAMA certification and membership level seals for promotional use on business cards, stationary, brochures, or websites. These seals can be saved on your computer: just visit the NAMA download page and right-click on the seal image and choose “save picture as” or “save image as.” Click to download a Certified Anger Management Specialist Level Seal.



Reminder: NAMA Member Questionnaire  
If you haven’t taken the questionnaire yet, please click to take the NAMA Member Questionnaire regarding the future direction of your organization. What are we going to be and do as a united voice? This survey will become the basis of how we impact the evolution of our culture and society and your anger management practice. Click to take the questionnaire now



December 2013

Holiday Message from NAMA
 
angelThe majority of the world’s resources pour into the United States. And as Americans grow more and more wealthy, money is becoming a kind of narcotic for us. We hardly notice our own prosperity or the poverty of so many others. The great contradiction is that we have more and more money and less and less generosity -- less and less public money for the needy, less charity for the neighbor. This has great systemic impact on the ever growing mass mood of anger.

I have been a runner all of my adult life and with this I have a tendency to keep my eye on Nike, the shoe company that has most popularized the sport by being the first to create a running shoe with the rubber soles made from a waffle iron with the intention of creating more shock absorption. As you know, Nike has expanded to become a shining star of global consumerism. You have likely watched some Nike ads recently. The Nike story says that our beginnings are in our achievements; and that we must create ourselves.

According to the Nike story, whoever has the most shoes when he dies - wins. The Nike story says there are no gifts to be given because there is no giver. We end up only with whatever we manage to get for ourselves. This story ends in despair. It gives us a present tense of anxiety, anger, fear, greed, craving and brutality. It produces child and wife abuse, indifference to the poor, the buildup of drones and armaments, divisions between people, and environmental racism. It tells us not to care about anyone but ourselves -- and it is the prevailing creed of our society.

Wouldn’t be wonderful if liberals and conservatives among us, who love to quarrel with each other, could come to the common realization that the real issue is whether there is a loving energy of abundance moving the whole of the universe that can be trusted in the face of the story of scarcity? What we know in the secret recesses of our hearts and minds is that the story of scarcity is a tale of death.

Of course it is easier to talk about these things than to live them. Many people, both members of NAMA and legions of our clients and patients, haven’t a clue about the reality of abundance. We must begin to teach this now. As a growing group of cultural creatives, those of us who work in the trenches of the anger management profession understand that the story of scarcity is not only destroying the fabric of society, but that the simple notion of gratitude flips the states of anger and deprivation like nothing else.

May you have an abundance of realization as we approach this amazing moment in history.

So as we move deeper into the holiday season, Let’s not Just Do It, but also Become and Be it!

Happy Holidays!

Rich Pfeiffer, President Board of Directors

 
Video & Handouts from Conference Now Only $49  
conferenceVideos and handouts of the "Advances in Anger Management & Domestic Violence" Conference, Oct. 24-25, 2013, Tucson, AZ are now only $49.

Thanks to an anonymous donor, NAMA is able to offer the Conference presentations and handouts for a drastically reduced rate. Don’t miss the opportunity to access online all the significant state-of-the art information on treatments for anger management and domestic violence presented at the Conference in Tucson. Here is what is available:
bulletAnger Management in a New Era: Using Brain Science to Improve Treatment - Ron Potter -Efron, MSW, PhD
bulletDomestic Violence Offender Treatment in a New Era - Ron Potter-Efron, MSW, PhD, Pat Potter-Efron, MSW
bulletBeyond Emotional and Cognitive Intelligence: What is spiritual intelligence? - Rich Pfeiffer, MDiv, PhD
bullet7 Affective Systems: Looking closer at the Primitive Brain - Rich Pfeiffer, MDiv, PhD
bulletNew Mindfulness Techniques for Anger Management - Rich Pfeiffer, MDiv, PhD, Laura Moss, CAMS-III
bulletKeys to Defusing Anger and Hostility in Marriage - Lynette Hoy, , NCC, LCPC, CAMS-IV, Steve Yeschek, LCSW
bulletYield Theory of Anger Management – Christian Conte, PhD
bulletLegal Implications for Anger Management – David Hoy, Attorney at Law

 
The Relational Imperative in Anger Management and Domestic Violence Work  
The client/specialist relationship is a critical aspect of Anger Management and Domestic Violence work. As anger management professionals, we bring our own life experiences to this relationship. It is helpful for us to be self-aware of this dynamic.

Studies (see below) clearly suggest that many individuals with anger problems have a history of trauma, especially physical trauma. Research (below) also indicates that the “working relationship” is a vital piece of success in treating individuals with trauma.

NAMA has consistently emphasized the importance of creating a positive working relationship between the client and the specialist. It can be said that anger problems originate in the context of a relationship; and that the healing of these problems will occur in the context of a relationship (with the Specialist) as well. This is one of the primary reasons that NAMA does not endorse anger management or domestic violence programs or trainings that do not include at least one component of human face-to-face relationship.

Charney DS. Psychobiological mechanisms of resilience and vulnerability: implications for successful adaptation to extreme stress. Am J Psychiatry.2004 Feb;161(2):195-216.

Kessler RC, Galea S, Gruber MJ, Sampson NA, Ursano RJ, Wessely S. Trends in mental illness and suicidality after Hurricane Katrina. Mol Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;13(4):374-84. Epub 2008 Jan 8

Watson PJ, Shalev AY. Assessment and treatment of adult acute responses to traumatic stress following traumatic events. CNS Spectr. 2005 Feb;10(2):123-31.

 
Reminder: NAMA Member Questionnaire  
If you haven’t taken the questionnaire yet, please click to take the NAMA Member Questionnaire regarding the future direction of your organization. What are we going to be and do as a united voice? This survey will become the basis of how we impact the evolution of our culture and society and your anger management practice. Click to take the questionnaire now

 
A Domestic Violence Credential from NAMA  
Planning is underway for NAMA endorsed two-day training events for those of you who already hold an Anger Management Specialists Certificate. Completing this training will allow you to obtain an additional Credential in Domestic Violence from NAMA. Dr. Ron and Pat Potter-Efron will be spearheading this project. Dr. Ron is writing a new book and curriculum on the integration of anger management and domestic violence. The primary emphasis will be on the safety of all people involved in the domestic difficulties; and also providing the opportunity for individual growth in dealing with their personal anger management issues. In other words: Safety first; and also growth. The excitement builds around this project. Stay tuned for more info.

 

November 2013

Successful 2013 Conference in Tucson
 
conferenceNAMA's first International Conference brought together dozens of attendees for presentations on the state-of-art treatments, techniques, models, and the inspiration of being together as a community. The sub-theme of the conference this year was " . . because cultural evolution depends on it."
Click to see more photos.

Plans are already in the works for next year's conference to be held in Chicago, Illinois, to be hosted by the Anger Management Institute (AMI) and the NAMA Midwest Chapter. Keep checking your NAMA Newsletter for more information and a "Call for Presentations." If you have suggestions for the next conference please email them to namass@namass.org

conference attendeeHere are some of the positive comments from those who attended the Advances in Anger Management and Domestic Violence Conference in Tucson:

"Well done!!!"; "Enjoyed the new trends in Anger Management i.e. Spirituality, Brain Change, and Yield Theory"; "Appreciated the sharing of practical experiences to drive down the points"; "Excellent overall"; "I like the domestic violence part of the conference"; "It was all good"; Loved the Mindfulness techniques and domestic  violence presentation";  "Yield Theory was great!!"; "Enjoyed being with colleagues"; "All the information and content was great"; "I liked learning about the legalities of anger management work"; "I liked the brain-based focus"; "The presenters were knowledgeable and approachable"; "Liked the stages of adult development"; "It was helpful to hear more of the various models of anger management"; "The content was very good'; "I walked away with something from every presentation"; "The handouts were very helpful."


 
Online Video of "Advances in Anger Management and Domestic Violence Conference" Now Available  
conferenceYou may now purchase access to the conference presentations video and handouts/slides (downloads) athttp://namass.org/Advances in Anger Management and Domestic Violence Online Video.htm.

 
NAMA Member Questionnaire  
Please take a few moments to fill out the NAMA Member Questionnaire regarding the future direction of your organization. What are we going to be and do as a united voice? This survey will become the basis of how we impact the evolution of our culture and society and your anger management practice.  Click to take the questionnaire now.

 
A Domestic Violence Credential from NAMA  
Planning is also underway for NAMA endorsed two-day training events for those of you who already hold an Anger Management Specialists Certificate. Completing this training will allow you to obtain an additional Credential in Domestic Violence from NAMA. Dr. Ron and Pat Potter-Efron will be spearheading this project and Dr. Ron is writing a new book and curriculum on the integration of anger management and domestic violence. The primary emphasis will be on the safety of all people involved in the domestic difficulties; and also provide the providing the opportunity for individual growth in dealing with their personal anger management issues.  In other words - Safety first; and also growth. The excitement builds around this project. Stay tuned for more info.

 
About NAMA
 
The National Anger Management Association is an independent, non-profit, professional organization for the advancement of anger management services, research, and the professional anger management specialist community. All active National Anger Management Association members are listed in the NAMA Online Directory. Fellow members are listed above Members and Diplomate members are listed above Fellows.

If you are not a member, find out more and apply online. If your membership has expired, you can renew your membership on your website.

Membership dues reminder notice goes to your email. If your email address is not correct, please update or send it to us at namass@namass.org.

 

 October 2013 

Domestic Violence Awareness Month – October  
purple ribbonOctober is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Domestic violence thrives when we are silent; but if we take a stand and work together, we can end domestic violence. Throughout the month of October, help NAMA to raise awareness about domestic violence and join in our efforts to end violence.
Domestic Violence Awareness Month evolved from the first Day of Unity observed in October, 1981 by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. The Day of Unity soon became a special month when a range of activities were conducted at the local, state, and national levels.
These activities were as varied and diverse as the program sponsors but had common themes: mourning those who have died because of domestic violence, celebrating those who have survived, and connecting those who work to end violence.
NAMA is including Domestic Violence as an integral component of the Advances in Anger Management and Domestic Violence Conference being held at the University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, October 24 & 25. Ron and Pat Efron-Potter are leaders in the inclusion of domestic violence within the context of Anger Management. They will be presenting two major conference topics at the conference: "Anger Management in a New Era: Using Brain Science to Improve Treatment" (Ron Potter-Efron, MSW, PhD) and "Domestic Violence Offender Treatment in a New Era" (Ron Potter-Efron, MSW, PhD, Pat Potter-Efron, MSW)
Advances in Anger Management and Domestic Violence Conference  
There is still time to register for the Advances in Anger Management and Domestic Violence Conference sponsored by NAMA to be held on October 24 & 25, 2013 at the University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.
arizona conferenceThroughout history, pioneering individuals have come together and changed the course of humanity. In fact, historians now think that the Renaissance only involved about 1,000 people--setting in motion the creativity and innovation that eventually launched the Western Enlightenment, the Scientific Revolution, and the sweeping changes of the modern world.
Today, we are approaching the edge of another profound turning point in human civilization. And the question is: who will be the innovators, explorers, and architects of the future? Who will be the contemporary equivalent of those 1,000 men and women who launched the last great shift in human culture?
Come join your colleagues, earn CEUs, and take home the state-of-the-are anger management and domestic violence treatments, skills, concepts, and techniques by participating in the NAMA 2013 Advances in Anger Management and Domestic Violence Conference. It promises to be extraordinary!
 
Conference Schedule:
Thursday, October 24, 2013
8:30 AM – Check-In
8:55 – Welcome
9:00 – Anger Management in a New Era: Using Brain Science to Improve Treatment – Ron Potter-Efron, MSW, PhD
Noon – Lunch (many food choices available in Student Union Memorial Center)
1:00 – 1:50 PM – 7 Affective Systems: Looking closer at the Primitive Brain – Rich Pfeiffer, MDiv, PhD
2:00 – 2:50 PM – Beyond Emotional and Cognitive Intelligence: What is spiritual intelligence? – Rich Pfeiffer, MDiv, PhD
3:00 – 3:50 PM – New Mindfulness Techniques for Anger Management – Rich Pfeiffer, MDiv, PhD
4:00 PM – Socialize
Friday, October 24, 2013
9:00 – 9:50 AM – Legal Implications for Anger Management – David Hoy, Attorney at Law
10:00 – 10:50 AM – Yield Theory of Anger Management: Working with people convicted of violent crimes – Christian Conte, PhD
11:00 –12:00 – Keys to Defusing Anger and Hostility in Marriage – Lynette Hoy, LCPC and Steve Yeschek, LCSW
Noon – Lunch (many food choices available in Student Union Memorial Center)
1:00 PM – Domestic Violence Offender Treatment in a New Era – Ron Potter-Efron, MSW, PhD and Pat Potter-Efron, MSW
4:00 PM – Close
Lodging for the Conference  
Aloft Tucson University Hotel
A block of rooms has been reserved at the Aloft Tucson University hotel which is located right next to the University of Arizona campus and within easy walking distance to the Conference. The brand new Aloft Tucson University hotel is located close to dining and entertainment.
Aloft Tucson University Hotel - 1900 East Speedway, Tucson, AZ. Reserve room
About NAMA
 
The National Anger Management Association is an independent, non-profit, professional organization for the advancement of anger management services, research, and the professional anger management specialist community. All active National Anger Management Association members are listed in the NAMA Online Directory. Fellow members are listed above Members and Diplomate members are listed above Fellows.

If you are not a member, find out more and apply online. If your membership has expired, you can renew your membership on our website.

Membership dues reminder notice goes to your email. If your email address is not correct, please update or send it to us at namass@namass.org.
 

September 2013

 

Advances in Anger Management and Domestic Violence Conference: It's Not Too Late to Register!  
If you have not yet registered for NAMA's Advances in Anger Management and Domestic Violence Conference, there is still time to get a seat. Come join your colleagues!
rich pfeifferConference Presenter – Rich Pfeiffer
Mindfulness Meditation Practice Myths
Rich Pfeiffer will present on the topic "New Mindfulness Techniques for Anger Management" at the upcoming Advances in Anger Management and Domestic Violence (see schedule).
He has practiced mindfulness meditation and contemplative prayer for over 30 years because as he says, "I needed it so much." Dr. Pfeiffer offers us four mindfulness practice myths to consider.
Mindfulness Meditation Practice Myth # 1: Trying To Reach A Fixed Or Static State Of Consciousness
Many meditators seek a specific feeling state or experience that they assume is the goal of meditation. You may seek this state during the meditation, or as a result of the meditation -- or both.
Such privileged states might include a sense of peace, calm, tranquility, openness, joy, or spaciousness.
This is an extremely common approach to mindfulness practice, but the truth is that achieving a particular heightened state of consciousness is not the point of mindfulness practice.
In fact, it can sometimes be counterproductive to mindfulness' real purpose.
The problem with this goal is that feeling and experience states naturally come and go, and always will. Trying to achieve them permanently is a lost cause.
Even IF you achieve one of these "desired" states briefly, you will likely be disappointed when it inevitably passes or "crashes." Then you might also think the meditation, or worse that you, somehow failed.
Many people never achieve such states at all -- and that's fine (it doesn't mean the practice isn't "working"). But that too tends to discourage meditators, who may believe they're not doing it right because they're never reaching some "ideal" meditative feeling.
Too many meditation practices go by the wayside based on this unfortunate notion.
When you learn that it isn't even necessary or desirable to feel a certain way or reach a certain state of consciousness, you can penetrate much further into meditation's profound and infinite possibilities.
Mindfulness meditation is actually about the practice of liberation from all states -- an enlightened relationship to everything that arises or ever could arise -- with no need to feel any particular way at all.
Mindfulness Meditation Practice Myth #2: Spending Months or Years Trying to Get Back to "That One Awesome Experience"
Even though it's a misplaced objective to seek preferred states such as those described above, many people who do happen to have a special experience during meditation get fixated on trying to recreate that experience.
That's especially true if the heightened state was particularly exciting or pleasurable.
Even though it's not the goal or purpose, mindfulness meditation may occasionally and spontaneously involve unusual sensations, visions, or other phenomena.
These experiences certainly don't hurt (and may be pleasant or inspiring), but neither do they help us in any real way on the path or in our lives.
Dramatic experiences are not required, or even a given -- and they can be detrimental if they become a distraction.
Meditators who experience anything remarkable during practice often try to recreate that experience with each subsequent meditation.
But such experiences cannot be "claimed," nor can they regularly be reproduced.
Focusing on them takes you off track from the real value of mindfulness, which is the consistent practice of letting go no matter what kind of experience you're having.
If you're meditating in an attempt to reproduce an experience from the past, you're not letting go at all -- and therefore you're missing the true potential of mindfulness meditation.
Mindfulness Meditation Practice Myth #3: Why You Can't Meditate Your Way to Eternal Peace
Peace and relaxation are widely promoted as the primary purpose of mindfulness meditation. In fact, "calm feelings" are often touted as THE benefit of meditation from a health point of view.
But this narrow emphasis limits the potential for a much more profound experience of meditation.
Because sustained calm is not easily achievable for most of us -- or even the true goal of mindfulness -- it's also a chief cause of disappointment. It leads many people to give up on meditation before they've truly tasted the extraordinary freedom it can bring.
Certainly, meditating can produce positive, relaxed feelings and sensations. It simply won't always do that.
Therefore, you may end up believing you've "failed" simply because your practice doesn't feel calm and peaceful every time, at every moment. And if that happens, you miss the greater opportunity that regular meditation practice offers for transformation and healing.
The good news is, "a peaceful meditation" is not the Holy Grail, because you can experience extraordinary life changes even if not every meditation experience is peaceful. 
Something much bigger -- and more useful -- is possible through mindfulness meditation.
What's possible is the cultivation of steadiness in the face of every changing life experience. This heightened capacity is much more significant than any superficial and fleeting "peace" that may or may not occur in meditation.
This ultimate kind of calm is deeper and more enduring. It is nothing less than liberation itself.
Imagine the freedom in remaining emotionally stable throughout life, no matter how difficult or uncomfortable circumstances become -- a relationship to your feelings that is unconditional.
Mindfulness Meditation Practice Myth #4: The Myth of the Quiet Mind
Many of us have been taught that mindfulness meditation is entirely about having a "still" mind; it's possibly the most pervasive assumption about meditation out there. Countless people have concluded that they're simply "not good at meditation" and given up because they were unable to quiet the mind.
A still mind is something we may experience in moments of mindfulness meditation, but it's not the ultimate goal, and (just as with feelings of calm, peace, or openness) it doesn't necessarily give you better results outside the meditation.
As with other diversions, pursuing this goal can actually distract you from the greater grace that's made possible by a consistent awareness practice.
What does provide results is learning how to "disengage" from your mind regardless of how active it might be.
By doing that, you discover the possibility of being free of your mind no matter what it's doing, which is ultimately much more liberating than merely "shutting it down."
Practically speaking, having a "quiet mind" in mindfulness meditation has limited value once you're back out into life where you need to think, engage, and use your mind.
What's far more valuable is achieving a deep presence of awareness and OK-ness that's stable regardless of what the contents of your mind might be in any moment.
Come to Rich Pfeiffer's lecture and many more at the Advances in Anger Management and Domestic Violence Conference, October 24 & 25, 2013 at the University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.
Looking forward to seeing you there! Please forward this email to your colleagues.
About NAMA
 
The National Anger Management Association is an independent, non-profit, professional organization for the advancement of anger management services, research, and the professional anger management specialist community. All active National Anger Management Association members are listed in the NAMA Online Directory. Fellow members are listed above Members and Diplomate members are listed above Fellows.

If you are not a member, find out more and apply online. If your membership has expired, you can renew your membership on your website.

Membership dues reminder notice goes to your email. If your email address is not correct, please update or send it to us at namass@namass.org.

 

 August 2013

http://nama.memberclicks.net/assets/news/nama-banner-nl.jpg

 NAMA Needs More Authorized Supervisors

 

NAMA Authorized Supervisors (CAMS-III) are important in helping individuals who take the various approved online Anger Management Specialist-I Certification courses. These courses are becoming increasingly popular. More people are choosing to study the basic content components online and take a basic content test. Then, they are required to take four phone supervision sessions to complete the requirements for CAMS-I.

If you are presently at the CAMS-II level and are interested in becoming a NAMA Authorized Supervisor (CAMS-III), you may start the process by completing the Supervision Mentored Program. Please contact the NAMA office at:namass@namass.org

This is a new program in which you will be required to collect 50 NAMA CEUs. By the way, attending all sessions at the Advances in Anger Management and Domestic Violence Conference, October 24 -25, 2013 will provide you with a whopping 25 CEUs from NAMA.

 

 

Advances in Anger Management and Domestic Violence Conference, October 24-25, 2013

 

rich pfeifferKeynote speaker - Ron Potter-Efron

Ronald Potter-Efron, CADCIII, LICSW, Ph.D. is a clinical psychotherapist and Director of the Anger Management Program at First Things First Counseling and Consulting Center in Altoona, WI. He specializes in the treatment of individuals with severe aggressive tendencies and domestic violence issues. Ron is also author of the Handbook of Anger Management (for professional readers); Angry All the Time; Letting Go of Anger and Letting Go of Shame (both with Patricia Potter-Efron). His newest release is Healing the Angry Brain (New Harbinger, 2012), a self-help book intended for chronically angry and aggressive persons. Dr. Potter-Efron is a Distinguished Diplomate of the National Anger Management Association.

Dr. Potter-Efron currently facilitates a 50-session domestic violence prevention program that utilizes the principles of neuroplastic change (long-term potentiation) to help clients devise and implement individualized brain-based behavioral change plans.

Dr. Potter-Efron has facilitated hundreds of professional seminars throughout the United States and abroad. He is known for his ability to make difficult material easier to understand and utilize, as well as for his good sense of humor and practical orientation toward therapeutic change.

Ron's first presentation topic is "Anger Management in a New Era: Using Brain Science to Improve Treatment." 
What does it mean to say that someone has an "angry brain?" What happens inside a person's brain when he or she gets angry? Is anger primarily an unconscious reaction to threat? What are the differences between predatory aggression, defensive rage, and irritable anger? How important is genetic variation in predicting a career of anger or aggression? Which neuromodulator links chemical addiction and angry behavior? How much is domestic violence an anger problem? What is the relationship between anger and anxiety? Is it correct to say "fight or flight" or should we say "fight, flight or freeze?" Perhaps most importantly, how can people with "angry brains" be helped to alter that behavior both at the conscious and unconscious levels? These are a few of the questions that will be asked and answered during this Keynote Presentation.

A few topics also included in Dr. Potter-Efron's Presentation:

bullet Eleven things you should know about the angry brain.
bullet Core information about the brain and its components.
bullet The emotional brain: the limbic system and the intrinsic value of emotions.
bullet The social brain: polyvagal theory and attachment theory; adult attachment and domestic violence.
bullet The angry brain: main brain pathways for defensive aggression and predatory aggression.
bullet Six phases of an anger episode: from activation through action to deactivation.
bullet Changing the angry brain: relevant principles of neuroplasticity.
bullet Rage: the most dangerous kind of anger and its relationship to violence and domestic violence.
bullet The angry/aggressive brain and the substance abuse connection.
bullet Ways to lessen unconscious anger activation.
bullet Ways to increase prefrontal cortex effectiveness with angry clients.
bullet Empathy: the key to long-term brain change for angry clients.

Other Conference Presentation Topics Include:

bullet Anger Management in a New Era: Using Brain Science to Improve Treatment - Ron Potter-Efron, MSW, PhD
bullet Domestic Violence Offender Treatment in a New Era - Ron Potter-Efron, MSW, PhD, Pat Potter-Efron, MSW
bullet Beyond Emotional and Cognitive Intelligence: What is spiritual intelligence? - Rich Pfeiffer, MDiv, PhD
bullet 7 Affective Systems: Looking closer at the Primitive Brain - Rich Pfeiffer, MDiv, PhD
bullet New Mindfulness Techniques for Anger Management - Rich Pfeiffer, MDiv, PhD
bullet Keys to Defusing Anger and Hostility in Marriage - Lynette Hoy, LCPC, CAMS-IV, Steve Yeschek, LCSW
bullet Legal Implications for Anger Management - David Hoy, Attorney at Law
bullet Yield Theory of Anger Management: Working with people convicted of violent crimes - Christian Conte, PhD

Click for a list of presenters, presentations, registration fees, and FAQ's.
Download the conference flyer.
Register by clicking here.

 

About NAMA

 

The National Anger Management Association is an independent, non-profit, professional organization for the advancement of anger management services, research, and the professional anger management specialist community. All active National Anger Management Association members are listed in the NAMA Online Directory. Fellow members are listed above Members and Diplomate members are listed above Fellows.

 

If you are not a member, find out more and apply online. If your membership has expired, you can renew your membership on your website.

 

Membership dues reminder notice goes to your email. If your email address is not correct, please update or send it to us at namass@namass.org.

 

 

 

July 2013

 

 

In Memory of
Anita Bohensky, PhD

 

Anita Bohensky, PhD, NAMA Distinguished Diplomate and CAMS-V, passed away peacefully recently having dealt with  breast cancer for many years. She was the author of the very popular Anger Management Workbook for Kids & Teens and co-author of Manage Your Anger: A Curriculum for Children.

anita bohensky

Anita was born and raised in Greenwich Village, NYC and was a "New Yorker" in every positive sense of the term. She loved culture – movies, theater, new restaurants, and the New York Times. She was sophisticated and social – receiving energy back from her many connections with people and nature. Anita had a special gift of being present to children. She was uniquely drawn to children -- her own daughters, Erin and Megan, as well as her step-daughters, Rebecca and Sara -- and of course her grandchildren, Jerome, Maria, Kevin, Ben and Jane -- and all the children she worked with in psychotherapy.

Professionally, she was a highly regarded and accomplished psychologist. She received her BA, MA, and PhD (Developmental Psychology) from New York University and was trained psychoanalytically at the Post graduate Center for Mental Health in NYC. She also had an abiding interest in Integral theory and its applications in the fields of Anger Management, mental health, and spirituality. Her professional career included: Assistant Professor of Psychology and Education at Teachers College Columbia University Center for Educational and Psychological Services, Consulting and Psychodiagnostic Psychologist SUNY, College of Optometry, Clinical Consultant at the New York Foundling Hospital, Psychoanalyst and Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist in Private Practice NYC, Faculty Member and Supervisor of Students at the Contemporary Center for Advanced Psychoanalytic Studies and also the Institute for Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy of New Jersey, a Staff Psychotherapist and faculty member and supervisor at the Creative Living Counseling Center NJ, the Clinical Director of Growth Central, and the founder and Director of the Whole Child and Adolescent Center, New York and Tucson, AZ.

She was the author of the highly acclaimed and very popular Anger Management Workbook for Kids and Teens, the Self-Esteem Workbook for Teens, the Binge Eating Workbook for Teens; and co-author of Manage Your Anger: A Curriculum for Children.

The world is a better place from her life and if there is a nirvana or heaven, as she entered, those waiting to greet her were in unison chanting, "Well done, well done, well done indeed."

Anita's Journal Writings -- These are selected journal entries in which she wrote about her reactions to her cancer related events. (PDF)

Remembering Anita Photo Group - A web space to remember Anita with photos of her journey through life has been created (a Snapfish Group Room). You will be asked to join the group roomto view the photos. You may make comments and upload any photos you have of her.

 

 

A Note from Dr. Rich Pfeiffer

 

rich pfeifferAs I work through the loss of Anita and some of how she has impacted me personally I find myself contemplating the paradox of our immense good fortune -- to have been born, in the words of the Chinese curse, "in interesting times".

On one hand, we are the luckiest and wealthiest people who have ever lived -- enjoying unprecedented wealth and ease, with plentiful delicious food, amazing art and technology, and choices -- including almost unlimited information and personal mobility. On the other hand, in the face of this bounty, most of us tend to feel the limitations on our personal options (comparing ourselves with even luckier people). Worse, we, and humanity, really do face unprecedented stresses and threats --we're in a world crisis, with environmental degradation, global warming, extreme weather, and simultaneous real crises in all our institutions and infrastructure -- financial, agricultural, educational, healthcare, political and more.

The bottom line: we face ample reasons to relax and rejoice in gratitude, and to get very serious about multiple "terrifying" challenges. I don't think we do either fully enough; these times ask to go way further -- in both directions, simultaneously. This is not merely a "deep paradox," it's a deep existential invitation to evolve our consciousness and culture.

In his bestselling book, You Must Change Your Life, German philosopher Peter Sloterdijk penned one of the most searing and prophetic paragraphs I've ever read. Please read it carefully:

"The . . global crisis . . as everyone has been noticing for some time, has begun to send out its apostles. Its authority is real because it is based on something unimaginable of which it is the harbinger: the global catastrophe. One need not be religiously musical to understand why the Great Catastrophe had to become the goddess of the century. As it possesses the aura of the monstrous, it bears the primary traits that were previously ascribed to the transcendent powers: it remains concealed, but makes itself known in signs; it is on the way, yet already authentically present in its portents; it reveals itself to individual intelligences in penetrating visions, yet also surpasses human understanding; it takes certain individuals into its service and makes prophets of them; its delegates turn to the people around them in its name, but are fended off as nuisances by most. On the whole, its fate is much like that of the God of monotheism when He entered the stage scarcely three thousand years ago: His mere message was already too great for the world, and only the few were prepared to begin a different life for His sake. In both cases, however, the refusal of the many increases the tension affecting the human collective. Since the global catastrophe began its partial unveiling, a new manifestation of the absolute imperative has come into the world, one that directs itself at everyone and nobody in the form of a sharp admonition: 'Change your life! Otherwise its complete disclosure will demonstrate to you, sooner or later, what you failed to do during the time of portents!'" -- (p. 444, You Must Change Your Lifeby Peter Sloterdijk, tr. Wieland Hoban, 2013, Polity Press, Cambridge, UK.)

On the surface, this might sound like a call for fear and grim austerity. And, appropriately, we don't want to go there. Intuitively, we know terror isn't healthy. Besides, apocalyptic hallucinations have been disproven again and again through history.

Worry is folly; lightheartedness and humor are the soul of true effectiveness. We need to regard this as a developmental crisis, as humanity's growth from adolescence to adulthood, or as a bloody "birthing" process, rather than a "dying" process. Biological evolution and cultural evolution have always proceeded under life-and-death challenges, and again and again, amazing creative novelty has burst forth. I'm an optimist, but it's not based on a rational assessment and a prediction. I am pretty sure that no expert decisively knows our odds of finessing this crisis or being visited by various nightmare scenarios. This makes me very confident that those who think they know we're doomed are wrong.

What to do? Many things, of course. But above all, we're called to do them from a deeper and deeper existential ground. This means constantly awakening from "the consensus trance" into a more and more profoundly awake and joyful seriousness.

I hope to see many of you at the Advances in Anger Management and Domestic Violence Conference in Tucson, AZ in October.

-- Rich Pfeiffer, June 2013

 

 

Seats Still Available at the October Conference

 

If you have not yet registered for NAMA's Advances in Anger Management and Domestic Violence Conference, there is still time to get a seat. Please join us!

Advances in Anger Management and Domestic Violence Conference, October 24 & 25, 2013 -- University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

Register Online

Download Conference Flyer & Registration Form

Click for a list of presenters, presentations, registration fees, and FAQ's.

Looking forward to seeing you there! Please forward this email to your colleagues.

 

 

About NAMA

 

The National Anger Management Association is an independent, non-profit, professional organization for the advancement of anger management services, research, and the professional anger management specialist community. All active National Anger Management Association members are listed in the NAMA Online Directory. Fellow members are listed above Members and Diplomate members are listed above Fellows.

 

If you are not a member, find out more and apply online. If your membership has expired, you can renew your membership on your website.

 

Membership dues reminder notice goes to your email. If your email address is not correct, please update or send it to us at namass@namass.org.

 

 

 

 

                         

Copyright @ NAMA 2005 - 2014 -DBA - National Anger Management Association (NAMA) and National Domestic Violence Association (NDVA)